The best hotels in Paris

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  • The best hotels in Paris

    1. LA RÉSERVE

    Designed by Jaques Garcia, colours at La Réserve are largely limited to black, red and green, blue-grey, Champagne and chocolate, with here and there some vivid flashes of gold and pools of burgundy so deep you could drown in them. Facing the Grand Palais and, at a slightly greater distance, the Eiffel Tower, overlooking the Champs-Elysées, a few doors down from the presidential palace – the location couldn’t be much better.

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    Read the full La Réserve exclusive first hotel review.

    Exclusive review: La Réserve, Paris

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    2. LE MEURICE

    Paris’ first palace-status hotel, Le Meurice is a gilded city spin on Versailles – an institution and ornate refuge from the rue Rivoli crowds. Since its 1835 opening, the hotel served as an epic shorthand for Parisian history – Picasso married here, Salvador Dalí lived here, and Queen Victoria stayed here in 1855. Its splendid Haussmann façade overlooks the Tuileries gardens, with a sweeping panorama from the Louvre to the Eiffel Tower, and bejewelled Louis XIV wall peacock inside. This is where Philippe Starck’s fabulously jarring modernity creeps in – note his Dalí-inspired sweeping ceiling art in the Restaurant Le Dalí and his transparent plastic chairs spread across the decadent Restaurant le Meurice Alain Ducasse. Rooms and suites vary in size and splendour, all echoing (to a more modern pitch) the 18th-century spirit governing the ground floor. Jocelyn Herland (previously at the Dorchester) is at the helm of the two Alain Ducasse restaurants which, with French classics and Mediterranean dishes, pull in a curious mix of coiffed locals and global movers and shakers. By Rosalyn Wikeley

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    3. LE BRISTOL

    Le Bristol, one of the greatest grande dame hotels in Paris, is undeniably grand, but for all the polished marble, Louis XVI fauteuils, showcases by Paris’ premier jewellers and stupendous flower arrangements, the place feels delightfully warm rather than stuffy, correct rather than stiff, and refreshingly untroubled by corporate diktats. And look out for the fluffy white Burmese cat draped over the concierge desk – this is Fa-Raon, the hotel mascot. Located close to the Elysée Palace — at the quieter end of the chic rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré, it was built as a hotel in 1925 and today is owned and run by the Oetker Collection (whose other hotels include The Lanesborough in London and Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc in Antibes). A six-year, top-to-toe facelift was finally finished in 2018, adding sleek new suites – but the overall style remains untouched: classic, conservative, chintzy and understated. Pale boiserie walls are hung with gilded mirrors, luxuriant Manuel Canovas and Pierre Frey fabrics, rooms are filled with antique furniture and chandeliers, and bathrooms are awash with marble. The loveliest rooms – each different – are the 36 that overlook the 12,900 sq ft enclosed garden, with its geometric lawns, clipped boxes, magnolias, azaleas and honeysuckle. There’s a brilliant La Prairie spa, a delightfully retro pool, plus four Michelin stars under one roof – chef Eric Frechon celebrates 20 years in situ in 2019 and legendary fine-dining restaurant Epicure is often lauded as one of the world’s best. Le Bristol is as quintessentially Parisian as hotels come – no wonder this was where Woody Allen chose to shoot parts of Midnight in Paris.

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    4. SINNER

    It’s not difficult to stumble across a romantic hotel in Paris, but you’d be hard-pressed to find a more explicitly sultry place to stay than the suitably named Sinner. The third Parisian hotel from the EVOK group, Sinner is the naughty little sister in the Haut-Marais channelling medieval Catholicism-meets-Fifty Shades. From the moment you arrive, you’re immersed in the decadent theatrics: ecclesiastically clad staff with glowing red lanterns guide you through the Frankincense-scented, candlelit lobby past the confessional booth and crypt, down dramatically dark corridors with sinister-looking red doors, to your room. Unless you opt for the brooding, almost dungeon-like black and red Justine Suite, the rooms are surprisingly serene and comfortable with pastel colours, Art Deco and classical flourishes, an opulent minibar, a turntable and shelves of art books – although the lubricant in the bathroom and the riding crop in the wardrobe cheekily remind you that naughtiness is more than encouraged. Elsewhere, the suggestive atmosphere continues in the cosy candlelit spa with black-tiled hammam and hot tub, which offers treatments created by Jimmy Jarnet, including a 50-minute blindfolded massage with hands and feet tied (as well as more conventional scrubs and facials). The popular ground-floor restaurant is headed up by Algerian chef Adam Bentalha, and serves an eclectic menu spanning dishes from North Africa, the Middle East, Malaysia and Peru. By day, it’s light and airy, full of sophisticated families enjoying tagines and ceviche while their toddlers try to grab nearby artworks. Head back once night falls and it transforms into a pumping party spot with a dramatic smoke machine, DJ and a crowd of cool kids and flirty couples. Although it’s the ideal spot for seekers of debauchery, hedonists and couples celebrating, ahem, special occasions, you can easily ignore the more sinful suggestions and just innocently enjoy the handy location, comfortable and stylish rooms and exciting food.

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    Sinner hotel review

    Sinner hotel: is this the naughtiest hotel in Paris?

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    5. COUR DES VOSGES, THE MARAIS

    On the oldest square in Paris with its Louis XIII architecture, blush-pink buildings and primped and preened gardens sits a heavy, nondescript door, wedged between a traditional brasserie and a new-age patisserie. This swings into the quiet, cobbled courtyard belonging to Cour des Vosges, a 17th-century mansion that’s a refuge for the cultured polymath with its evocative interiors, a subterranean Roman bath and views across the square. A fictional family art collection is rolled out across the four floors and all the rooms are different. One top-floor room has a bath with a glass-wall view, but it’s the first-floor rooms – traditionally where Parisian nobility would lay their heads – that are the real show-offs, with original wooden beams, terracotta floors covered in baby-blue rugs and clay-coloured, unpainted walls dressed in tapestries and modern art. In one, a steel spin on the four-poster is immense, swallowing most of the room and shutting out the neighbouring retro furniture with futuristic sliding doors. While there’s no restaurant, you’ll find Pâtisserie Brach on the ground floor – a tearoom peacocking feted patissier Yann Brys’ pastries. Breakfast is the headline performance when it comes to food, served in your room with a cavalcade of silverware, cold-pressed juices, pastries, yogurts and organic eggs – to which black truffle and caviar can be added. As for the crowd: elusive movers and shakers who wish to be left alone in the company of Voltaire and de Beauvoir, until another glass of Burgundy is called for. By Rosalyn Wikeley

    Read the full Cour des Vosges hotel review.

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    6. HOTEL PROVIDENCE

    Once slightly seedy neighbourhoods most notable for being close to the Gare du Nord and Gare d’Est, the 9th and 10th arrondissements have long been smartening up their act. On a surprisingly quiet stretch of this part of town, bohemian Hôtel Providence is fighting hard for the title of coolest design hotel in the area – and with stiff competition from neighbours The Hoxton and Hôtel des Grands Boulevards. Bedrooms here are swathed in the kind of patterns interiors junkies wish they were bold enough to include in their own home: palm print; black with striking gold leaf; intricate needle-work designs like a Moroccan Berber rug; solid, bold indigo. Bigger rooms are furnished with velvet sofas in deep jewel shades to collapse into after a day of exploring, and some have a balcony overlooking the peaceful street below. All have stylish bathrooms with monochrome metro tiles and double sinks, and rainfall showers. Downstairs, the floral bar spills onto the street outside, where guests drink rosé glacé.

    Around the back, a cosy room near the kitchen is the setting for breakfast – although our advice is to get your fill of sensible foods here (there’s plenty of yogurts, fruits and cereals, and an ice bucket of individual green juices) and then head around the corner to Du Pain et des Idées for croissants and pain au chocolat (it’s one of the best boulangeries in the city, so why not?). Also in the area find game-changing bar Experimental Cocktail Club and Big Mamma Group outpost Pizza Popolare, French cousin to Shoreditch’s hottest table Gloria. By Sarah James

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    7. LE PIGALLE

    This little Parisienne in the heart of once-sketchy, now super-cool Pigalle (on the on the border of the 9th and the 18th arrondissements) is well thought through. It’s from the group behind Instagram-famous Les Roches Rouges on the Côte d’Azur , so we knew it would be. The rooms, which are small, are kitted out with Art Deco furniture and shelves stacked with well-curated photographs. There are turntables and a selection of vinyl as well as pre-mixed Negronis and Manhattans in bottles in the mini bar. There’s no denying the neighbourhood is lively at night – the hotel is on a strip just south of the Metro that’s full of strip clubs and sex shops, but also fun bars such as Dirty Dick and Lipstick. Downstairs in the lobby, as well as a marble-topped co-working space, there’s a red velvet curtain which pulls back to reveal a velvet banquet, neon sign and pole. Find young couples recovering from hangovers over a breakfast of avocado toast with cream cheese and croissants that’s served until 4pm. For those seeking a cool sleepover within walking distance of a fun night out, this is the place to stay if you’re partying in Paris. By Tabitha Joyce

    Shop the interiors of Le Pigalle with Maison Flaneur.

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    8. HOTEL LUTETIA, ST GERMAIN

    When Hotel Lutetia first threw open its doors in 1910, it was deemed very much ahead of the curve. A fusion of Art Nouveau and Art Deco architecture, it was the first true luxury hotel on the Left Bank – and to this day it remains the only Palace Hotel to grace this side of town. Camus and Sartre came to ponder existentialism in its grand salons; Matisse and Picasso took up residence in the suites and Josephine Baker’s performances in the bar helped sweep Paris into the Jazz Age. In short, it perfectly captured the artistic zeitgeist of the time. And despite the fact that it has changed hands countless times over the decades, no overhaul of the hotel has been as extreme – or impressive – as the latest one. Overseen by The Set hotel group (of London’s Hotel Café Royal and the Conservatorium in Amsterdam), a four-year overhaul stripped back layers of plaster to reveal original frescoes, opened up gloomy internal courtyards to flood the place with light and slashed the number of bedrooms to create a luxury so often absent in Parisian hotels: space. Downstairs, public areas shine in marble and brass; there’s a hushed spa with a pool actually big enough to swim in; and there are six restaurants and bars – the flagship, Brasserie Lutetia, is overseen by Michelin-starred chef Gérald Passédat. In the bedrooms, hand-blown Murano glass lamps light up tactile wooden panelling painted midnight blue, while baths are carved from two-ton slabs of Carrara marble (ceilings had to be reinforced to take the weight). And at the end of 2018, the final touch was unveiled; a handful of signature suites designed to pay homage to the hotel’s artistic spirit. Fitted out with artworks and antiques supplied by Paris’s most prestigious club of art dealers and collectors, the Carré Rive Gauche suite is more akin to a private museum (and it’s all for sale). The Francis Ford Coppola suite, meanwhile, is a utopia for film buffs. This is the star director’s private home in the city, and he’s filled it with stills, photographs and movie memorabilia from his own collection. His vintage Éclair camera sits on one cabinet, his original annotated copy of The Godfather on another. But the best bit is the terrace – hidden above a slither of retractable-glass roof – which has exactly the type of knockout cinematic views people come to Paris for. By Teddy Wolstenholme

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    9. 9CONFIDENTIEL

    Philippe Starck has done it again, and this time he’s brought a flirty Art Deco hotel to the lower Marais. With falafel-favourite Miznon just to the east and French fashion brands The Kooples, Maje and Sandro to the west, this petite mirror-glazed gem is a very affordable and comfortable hideaway with a funky feel to boot. There isn’t a traditional lobby here – blink and you’ll miss the entrance – but, nonetheless, it feels straight out of Twenties Paris, with its dusty-pink and yellow walls, diamond-shaped rugs and geometric-print cushions. Each of the 29 rooms is named after a mademoiselle of the time and has a picture-postcard view of Parisian rooftops and enormous fluffy beds – a welcome retreat for an evening of wine and steak frites. Nicolas de Soto (formerly of Experimental Cocktail Club) is behind the bar, and while the drinks are worth stopping by for, people might not spot it when walking past. Baskets of mini croissants are laid out for breakfast – but we’d suggest heading over to Parisian favourite Circus, on the Left Bank, for their fresh-from-the-oven cinnamon rolls and frothy cappuccinos. By Katharine Sohn

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    10. HOTEL DES GRANDS BOULEVARDS

    Ten years ago the Experimental Group – actually three perfectly respectable former school chums – transformed the Paris bar scene with their sweetly raffish Experimental Cocktail Club. More recently they went into hotels, first with the charming Grand Pigalle, then with the equally perky Henrietta in London. And now there’s Hôtel des Grands Boulevards, which may be the most irresistible of all.

    Grands Boulevards is at once a historical term, referring to Baron Haussmann’s transformative thoroughfares; a Métro station; and, for many Parisians, words likely to conjure up a rather unkind image of wide-eyed yokels from beyond the périphérique pouring into and out of the theatres in the area. You really ought to join them. This is one of the most diverse and dynamic parts of the city, from those much-loved theatres to the glorious covered arcades and teeming textile workshops.

    The would-be flâneur couldn’t choose a more convenient or prepossessing base than Hôtel des Grands Boulevards, an 18th-century townhouse converted into 50 rooms, a restaurant and three bars. Interior designer Dorothée Meilichzon riffs with textures, shapes and colours in her distinctive, delightful way.

    None of the rooms are vast but there isn’t a dud among them: with their luscious greens, blues and pinks, they’re at once simple and sensuous. And the group continues to deliver on its experimental promise: whatever you order to drink, expect to be pleasantly surprised. If in doubt, start with the Experience 1: vodka, elderflower syrup, lemon juice, lemongrass and basil. By Steve King

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    The cheapest nicest hotels in Europe for 2020 – from just £60 a night

  • The best hotels in Paris

    11. HOTEL GRAND POWERS

    The Grand Powers, in the 1st arrondissement behind the Champs-Élysées, does have a certain grandeur – it’s been a hotel in Paris since 1920 and is a stalwart of the city’s scene. Thanks to the building’s corner spot, there are views of the Eiffel Tower just poking above the romantic rooftops from almost half of the rooms.. And there are balconies too, meaning that the bedrooms are lighter, as well as much bigger, than the majority of boutique hotel rooms in the city. Deep red clashes with pale pink; dark teal with spearmint cream; and gilded mirrors complement plush velvets and scrawling florals. A member of the Small Luxury Hotels of the World group, the Grand Powers feels cosy, and the staff are exceptionally helpful and delightfully jolly, while not being too much. At breakfast there are just-baked madeleines as well as eggs made to order – the boiled ones come shell-less in silver egg cups with Jenga-style soldiers. But there are also detox juices with beetroot and ginger and sushi-grade salmon in thick slices. This hotel provides quiet respite from the busy shopping district – so much so, you wouldn’t know the Arc de Triomphe was just a 10 minute stroll away. By Tabitha Joyce

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    12. HOTEL PLAZA ATHENEE

    Sheer luxury hits you in its grandest form at the Plaza Athénée, one of the best hotels in Paris. Immortalised as the glamorous backdrop in the season finale of Sex and The City, the hotel has 145 spacious rooms and 43 suites, all impeccably furnished — some in Louis XVI and Regency style (six floors) and others in Art Deco style (two floors). Some rooms overlook avenue Montaigne, others face on to a peaceful internal courtyard, where an ice-skating rink is erected in winter. Rooms are beautifully decorated, with elegant furnishings, marble bathrooms and every comfort imaginable: from plasma screen TVs and high-speed Internet access, to a pillow menu, hypo-allergenic linens, and the Berluti Service, bespoke grooming for the well-being of your shoes. The hotel’s celebrated restaurant, Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athénée, has three Michelin stars. The sleek bar serves some of the best cocktails in Paris, all perused on mini hand-held digital screens by an improbably glamorous clientele.

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    13. FOUR SEASONS GEORGE V PARIS

    Situated off the Champs Elysées, the landmark George V hotel was lovingly refurbished several years ago. It houses 245 guest rooms including 61 suites, 30 of which have private terraces or balconies overlooking the city’s rooftops.

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    14. ADELE & JULES

    Adèle and Jules are two halves of a single charming hotel or, technically, two hotels in one block. Reserved romantics will appreciate its low-hype offering — 30 varied bedrooms in each of the buildings, a Taittinger-led honesty bar in Adèle and a superb welcome with a proper concierge service. This is combined with a tucked-away location in a newly but not aggressively trendified slice of the 9th, close to rue des Martyrs (food shopping), Grands Boulevards (nightlife) and the Gare du Nord. Designer Stéphane Poux’s style is a deliberate mishmash of urbanity and generous homeliness, his eye travelling around ikat prints, Indian cotton quilts and witty, intriguing artworks. Club rooms have balconies big enough for prolonged nightcaps, a bathtub and twin basins. If you get a view — say of the landmark BNP Paribas building or Grand Rex cinema — the smaller deluxe rooms are charming too. Breakfast features eggs, sausages and mini viennoiseries, and between 4pm and 6pm there’s a pick-me-up of Dammann Frères tea, cakes, pastries and fruit. This takes place in a cosy living/breakfast room lined with decent reading material: not just the usual glossies, but also shelves of Folio paperbacks. The no-restaurant issue is very much a non-issue, with local options including Abri, Vivant, Richer and Saturne. A sibling to long-time fashion-pack bolthole Hôtel Thérèse in the 1st and Hôtel Recamier in Saint-Germain, this civilised, chic four-star deserves to become a cult hero/heroine as well. [I]By Sophie Dening[/i]

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    15. HOTEL PANACHE

    Surely a stay in Paris should mean an inexpensive hostelry, with quirky stairs and a receptionist who points you in the direction of the best tagine or moules, located next to a thrift shop piled with back editions of Tintin et les Egoutiers. And so it is here, in the spirited 9th arrondissement, created by Dorothée Meilichzon, who started off designing toys. The unusual flat-iron shape of Panache’s 19th-century building means that each of its 40 bedrooms has a slightly odd configuration, with everything a little askew, prettily Deco-tiled, dove-grey bathrooms and bevel-edged mirrors positioned to coax a sense of symmetry. All is perfectly quiet until (and this is a moment to cherish) you fling open the windows of your room in the early evening and people-watch from a little balcony overhanging the sweet clamour of the streets radiating from the corner below: locals walking their Jack Russells, antiquarian booksellers hurrying back from the nearby Passage Verdeau, all the café conversations of the Grands Boulevards district. Panache also has a mosaic-decorated restaurant serving Middle Eastern-inspired small plates, with a female sommelier who modishly recommends delicious natural or raw wines supplied by dedicated French growers whose hard-working, summer-dusty hands are sometimes photographed for the bottle labels. Then a stagger up those lopsidedly long-winding stairs to bed. There is little here not to love. By Antonia Quirke

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    16. HOTEL DE JOBO

    The splendidly named Bambi Sloan, who did the interiors of this ravishing little place in the Marais, isn’t quite sure how to describe herself. She says she’s part designer, part storyteller. She might consider calling herself a history teacher as well. Among other things, Jobo is an amusing education in certain aspects of French life, art and culture in the post-revolutionary period. The name comes from Josephine Bonaparte, Napoleon’s first wife and, briefly, Empress of France. From this position of eminence, she indulged her racy and refined tastes — leading the craze for leopard skin, for example, and for swans, and, more than anything else, for roses. All of which are not merely in evidence at the hotel but effectively define it. The result is intense but delightful — it’s too witty, too thoughtfully executed to be oppressive. The decadent toffs with whom Josephine caroused in the years after the revolution called themselves ‘Les Incroyables et Les Merveilleuses’. Hôtel de Jobo is both incredible and marvellous. It’s also tiny. The ceilings are low, the corridors narrow and the size of the bedrooms ranges from a mere 15 square metres to a modest 40. But that’s more than enough if you’re Napoleon and Josephine in the early throes of fascination, with no need for anything more than a comfortable bed surrounded by roses and leopardskin and swans. By Steve King

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    17. LE MONTANA

    Most ordinary citoyens have a better chance of being awarded the Légion d’Honneur than they have of getting into the basement nightclub at Le Montana, off the Boulevard Saint-Germain. Since it opened in 2009, it has set new standards in ego-crushing exclusivity and it’s still turning them away in droves. The upper floors of the building, however, have evolved in interesting ways, with the recent addition of a restaurant, six rooms and a roof terrace. The bedrooms, one on each floor, are individually themed but very much of a piece, with designer Vincent Darré’s fingerprints all over them — as yours will be, too, the moment you touch any of the glossy surfaces. There’s the luminous Miroir d’Argent room (mirrors and brushed steel); Blanc Graffiti (inspired by Jean Cocteau’s scrawled-upon studio); Bleu Acide (something to do with Montparnasse in the 1950s); Rouge David X (as in David Hicks, with the X pronounced ‘eex’); Noir Métaphysique (walls painted in de Chirico-esque shapes), and Gris Paris (playful, feminine and not especially grey). All have bathrooms covered from floor to ceiling in black tiles. For easy access to a glamorous club and a spectacular roof terrace, minus the indignities of a long queue and a pre-dawn reverse commute, a room at Le Montana is money well spent. For a quiet night’s sleep, you’ll need to spend a little more on a pair of earplugs. By Steve King

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    18. LE ROCH HOTEL & SPA

    When Le Roch (‘rock’ not ‘rosh’) opened, the local parish priest and the headmistress from the school around the corner dropped by to say hello. They must be pretty chic pastoral types; certainly they’re tending their flocks in a very smart neighbourhood adjacent to the Place Vendôme. But somehow the gesture seems just right. Le Roch, despite its velvety textured swishiness and its fancy address, has a winningly unaffected aura. You sense it the moment you step inside off the rue Saint-Roch — a quiet byway hidden among the grand thoroughfares that dominate this part of the city. There’s an easy flow from lobby through to library, bar, dining room and courtyard. The space is small enough to seem intimate, big enough to seem buzzy — an agreeable balance that characterises the hotel as a whole. Designer Sarah Lavoine’s rooms are elegant but not flamboyant, imaginative but not ostentatious. She has a particular fondness for bleu de canard and subtle Moroccan elements: zellige tiles in the bathrooms and thick, contemporary Berber carpets that feel great underfoot. Staff are enthusiastic and on-it. There’s no attitude but bundles of know-how. Benjamin Camus-Durand is, at 25, the youngest head concierge to have been awarded the Clefs d’Or. The spa is a strong draw. Guests can order their own personalised range of bespoke skincare products, whipped up by cult brand Codage following a consultation and delivered to the hotel 48 hours later. By Steve King

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    19. AMASTAN PARIS

    Glimpsed from its quiet street behind the Champs-Elysées, this elegant little hotel could easily be mistaken for a private townhouse, which is exactly what the owner, Paris-based entrepreneur Zied Sanhaji, had in mind for his new project. Beyond the discreet entrance that leads to the reception is the lobby — a gorgeously assembled, high-ceilinged space with petrol-blue parquet floors and a gargantuan bookcase lined with leather-bound classics. But the real hub is the cheerful bar, flood-lit with natural light all day, and its leafy courtyard garden for summer soirées. The 24 bedrooms vary from small but cosy to big, attic-like spaces with private balconies. In all, uncluttered simplicity prevails, with white and blue contrasting walls, contemporary walnut desks and immaculate white bed linen; bathrooms are sensible and decked out in marble, some with standalone bathtubs, all with large showers. Generous breakfasts — fresh fruit, cheese platters, smoked salmon and baskets of croissants — are served at one long, high table in the bar. The hotel also has a small pop-up shop stocking a range of art, jewellery and homeware from lifestyle brands such as Lola James Harper and NOCC interior design. After midday, the bar morphs into Anouk, an informal restaurant for light meals (chicken-liver mousse with whisky-spiked jelly; avocado toast; passion-fruit cheesecake). And you’ll be back again after dark for a flashy signature cocktail, such as the G&T infused with goji berries or squid ink. By Lanie Goodman

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    20. C.O.Q. HOTEL

    The acronym actually stands for Community of Quality, and the idea is to showcase French creativity in a laid-back, guesthouse atmosphere, a concept masterminded by the owner, entrepreneur and first-time hotelier Michel Delloye. Don’t be misled by the name: it has nothing to do with the puffed-up Gallic rooster, le coq, the emblem of French pride. There’s nothing remotely showy about this place in the 13th arrondissement. The 50 bedrooms — dreamed up by young interior designers Pauline d’Hoop and Delphine Sauvaget of Agence Favorite — are a study in sober elegance, with deep-blue walls, 19th-century portraits in gilt frames, and accents in mustard, rust and pink. Go for one of the bigger rooms with balconies and baths instead of showers, or a deluxe ground-floor room, hidden away on a terrace around the back. Quirky Made in France goodies — from tricolour men’s underwear to watches — are on sale in the lobby, where visitors can help themselves to a glass of Bordeaux while browsing. And with 20-odd French vintages stocked in the honesty bar, guests tend to make themselves at home in the cosy winter garden, lined with woven rugs and brocante finds. Breakfasts are bountiful — freshly squeezed juices, charcuterie, cheese and granola — but ask for the sublime, soft-boiled organic egg, served with baguette strips for dipping. For supper, head out to bistro Tempero, a 10-minute stroll away, for superb French classics reinvented with a Brazilian-Vietnamese twist. By Lanie Goodman

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    21. HOTEL BACHAUMONT

    It took three years to retune this one-time grand hotel, more recently a clinic, occupying a huge Haussmannian chunk of rue Bachaumont. The location is fantastic for Paris lovers who are just as into the hip food scene of the 11th arrondissement as they are the Musée d’Orsay and the Louvre. The trade-off for such a central stay is that the rooms are Paris-standard stingy in size, although you do get handsome design by Dorothée Meilichzon involving lots of mirrors, her signature upholstered headboards and smart Pierre Frey fabrics. If you jump straight into a suite, or at least a deluxe double, and give the noisy street-side rooms a miss, you won’t feel hard done by. Otherwise, the smaller rooms make perfectly good crashpads from which to enjoy the buzzy restaurant and bar, masterminded by the Experimental Cocktail Group. These spaces are on either side of a glazed passageway, tricked out with Phaidon and Taschen wares and trendy little cacti. More of Meilichzon’s covetable textiles give the lofty dining room a grown-up, fashion-y appeal, although it’s a young crowd who flirt over the roast-chicken rillettes, steak tartare and lamb shoulder to share. The vibe is still cool at breakfast when witch-house tunes drift around as creative-industry types attack Alain Milliat fruit juices, very buttery scrambled eggs and home-made chocolate-and-hazelnut spread. Stay a few days and make yourself at home in this car-free rue Montorgueil neighbourhood, which is almost entirely composed of bakeries, food and wine shops, bistros and bars. By Sophie Dening

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    22. NOLINSKI PARIS

    The French, while loftily affecting to despise American culture, have always been obsessed with certain of its manifestations — jazz, for example, and film noir, which they loved so much they named the entire genre. Perhaps it’s the very intensity of their love that prevents them from making many decent films noirs themselves. But when they do get it right — think of Jean-Pierre Melville’s Le Samouraï — the results can be sensational. I mention this because Nolinski, in a fine six-storey Haussmannian building on the Avenue de l’Opéra, moments from the Comédie Française, is rather like that. Its designer, Jean-Louis Deniot, fresh from his success with the Chanel spa at the nearby Ritz, has woven an intriguing nest from elements gathered with magpie relish from all over the world. (Many are for sale to guests — putting the ’boutique’ back into the boutique hotel.) Nevertheless, there’s a distinct preponderance of mid-century urban America about Nolinski — brassy, varnished, hard-edged, angular. And yet a certain Frenchness also inheres. One example: every room has a mini-bar housed in a cabinet designed in imitation of a safe — a bank safe of the kind a robber would crack in a film noir — inside which, among the spirits and sodas, guests will find a bottle of jus de cassis. Which is as quintessentially French as a mini-bar designed to look like a safe is American. A Le Samouraï moment: a collision of two worlds, from which both emerge not only unharmed but enhanced. By Steve King

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    23. GRAND PIGALLE HÔTEL

    With its creamy stone façade and slate-grey bar and restaurant, this freshly restored hotel is a real standout among its well-worn neighbours on a lively street in trendy SoPi (South Pigalle). It was conceived by the innovative Experimental Group — three childhood pals who founded the Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels and a flurry of Experimental Cocktail Clubs — as a ‘Bed & Beverage’ hotel. Here, the cocktail is gleefully celebrated, from the gold pineapple ornaments on the doors and the carpets patterned with Martini glasses right down to the bathrooms stocked with Cognac-scented products packaged in mini liquor bottles. Designed by Dorothée Meilichzon, the rooms are uncluttered, with vintage-style furniture, faux fireplaces, original pressed ceilings and colourful tiled bathrooms; mini-bars are well stocked with craft beers and pre-mixed Negronis for that one last nightcap.

    Book a garret-style room under the eaves on the top floor for the consummate bohemian experience and sweeping views across Montmartre. There’s no need to venture far for sustenance: the restaurant serves delicious bistro food (sea-bass carpaccio with yuzu; Basque-inspired cheeseburgers with chorizo) and has an impressive wine menu (200 varieties and counting). The buffet breakfast is a riot of homemade breads, jams and cakes, laid out prettily on the zinc bar. By Lanie Goodman

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  • The best hotels in Paris

    24. HOTEL BIENVENUE

    Just 10 minutes’ walk from the Gare du Nord, this is a very affordable Art Deco-style option in South Pigalle. The latest opening in the portfolio of Adrien Gloaguen (the independent hotelier behind nearby Hotel Panache (see below) and Hotel Paradis) sits on the grounds of the old Hotel Fenelon. But it’s no surprise that as the area has raised its game – it’s a current favourite among the hipster set – so has this hotel. Chloé Nègre is behind the smart interiors, and her carefully manicured touches (candy pink and white stripes and floral armchairs, a plant-filled courtyard with a patterned floor) have been popping up all over social media. The bedrooms, in pastel shades with huge matching velvet headboards and geometric-patterned carpets, are pretty mini, but nonetheless make for a great Parisian pied-à-terre, as the hotel is walking distance from the Tuileries Garden and the Marais. By Tabitha Joyce

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