22 of the world’s most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

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  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Anne-Sophie Pic

    Now heading up the kitchen at Raffles Singapore, and with two new Michelin stars at her London restaurant bringing her tally to eight, the trailblazer reveals her best buys

    CITRUS FRUIT FROM THE SOUTH OF FRANCE

    ‘Agrumes Bachès near Perpignan has to be one of the best addresses for citrus in the whole world. I love the scents and tangy aromas, especially the murcott, a mandarin-like summer fruit that goes with tomatoes and helps develop very sweet, almost honeyed notes. Its magic.’

    SEAWEED FROM BRITTANY

    ‘Everything sold at Bord a Bord in Roscoff is 100 per cent organic and sourced as locally as possible. I make really interesting savoury chutneys with its seaweed.’

    SAKE FROM KYOTO

    ‘There’s a traditional brewery in Fushimi called Sawaya Matsumoto that was founded in 1791. The sake is made with top-quality rice – it’s pure, precise and fresh. You can serve it cold, like Champagne, or warm, like tea. This is probably my favourite place to visit in Japan.’

    PLATES FROM ANNEYRON, FRANCE

    ‘Jars Ceramistes crafts the most beautiful tableware – lots of creamy white and turquoise ceramics – and I usually find some pieces that I want to take away with me. I use them at home, as well as in my restaurant in Valence, Maison Pic.’

    TEA FROM SHANGHAI

    ‘I don’t drink coffee and I’ve always been a big fan of tea. I visit Florence Samson’s Song Fang Teahouse whenever I’m in the city and never fail to spot something new. I adore the green tea, it’s special because it doesn’t undergo fermentation process like black tea does, and it has a slight bitterness and astringency that I like. Oolong was also a taste revelation for me and has formed the basis of lots of my dishes.’

    LITSEA CUBEBA FROM TAIWAN

    ‘Ever since I discovered this exotic verbena, I add it to all sorts of recipes to enhance the flavours. It works very well as an emulsion in my signature pudding, The White Millefeuille, where I cover flaky pastry layers in a cube of vanilla cream.’

    VEGAN PIZZA FROM VENICE BEACH

    ‘This neighbourhood is filled with memories for me – I first came here when I was in my 20s – but Gjelina was recommended to me more recently by a friend. It’s the type of restaurant where you could stay for half an hour or half a day, and the food is creative and delicious. I go there with my husband and son for pizza night.’

    HERB OF GRACE FROM SINGAPORE

    ‘Choucao, as this is also called, was my first discovery in the city. It has a remarkable bitter taste, and I use it in an adaptation of my signature dish, The Berlingots (French cheese-filled ravioli), at Raffles. It makes the perfect consommé to go with pasta parcels.’

    PERSIMMONS FROM SANTA MONICA

    ‘I came across this wonderful Wednesday Downtown Farmers Market during a visit to LA. There’s such a huge variety of produce, but the persimmons were particularly delicious – the best I’ve ever found.’

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Jay Blackinton

    Eleven years ago the chef was a vegan bike courier in Seattle – then he made the life-changing move to Orcas Island in Washington State and became a rooted carnivore, cooking and even hunting meat himself. Now his hogstone’s wood oven is a hit. Here are his favourite discoveries.

    RASPBERRIES FROM WALDRON, WASHINGTON

    ‘The best raspberries that I have ever had are from Nootka Rose Farm on Waldron Island, which is right next to Orcas. I can’t wait for them every year – they’re treated like gold in our kitchen. No other berry compares.’


    THE WILLOWS INN ON LUMMI, WASHINGTON

    ‘This has to be one of the most amazing restaurants in the USA. It serves one menu every night – somewhere around the 20-course mark, and I walk away inspired and a little humbled. The smoked black-cod doughnut is deeply delicious.’

    LAMB FROM THE ORCAS

    ‘In Olga, to the south of our restaurant, there is a man named Larry Parker who raised the best lamb on the planet. I’ve noticed over the years that the tastiest food always seems to come from places near the sea. There must be some special synergy. ’

    KNIVES FROM WALDRON

    ‘I have a wonderful utility knife that I use for harvesting at the farm, foraging out in the woods, skinning animals, cutting cheese and various other tasks. It’s made by Jim Wester of North Bay Forge; he primarily produces woodworking tools which are just as beautiful.’

    SEA URCHINS FROM THE FAROE ISLANDS

    ‘Some of the most memorable urchins I’ve eaten have come from here. The first time I tried them was a couple of years ago at Noma in Copenhagen; they were incredible, with another level of intensity.’

    PLUMS FROM ORCAS

    ‘Long ago the main economy here was fruit: apples and plums, predominantly. To this day many old heirloom trees remain, lots of them untamed at this point. The plums grown by our friend Ed Suij at Smiling Dog Farm are a pleasure to cook with.’

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Ana Roš

    The owner of slovenia’s restaurant Hisa Franko, named World’s Best Female Chef in 2017, shares her top kitchen finds

    CHILLIES FROM THAILAND

    ‘Thai food has to be some of my favourite in the world – it’s colourful and intense, and goes from sweet to sour to spicy. While I don’t really cook with Thai ingredients, I’m amazed by the contrast of flavours. Prik jinda chillies are incredible – the hotter the better.’


    SARDINES FROM PORTUGAL

    ‘Lisbon is the best city; I always buy fish in olive oil to take home. The technicolour tins are so pretty and Portuguese sardines and mackerel are such great quality that it’s worth keeping lots stored away.’


    SOURDOUGH FROM DENMARK

    ‘I usually round off a trip to Copenhagen at Mirabelle, a restaurant with its own bakery, so I can take sourdough home for my family. It’s different to the one we make at Hiša Franko due to the flour used and the high-temperature bake.’


    COTTON TABLECLOTHS FROM MADAGASCAR

    ‘This island is wonderful for shopping. I snapped up a lot of traditional Malagasy tablecloths, hand-embroidered with motifs of women around the edges, from the town of Antsirabe in the high plateau.’


    PASTA FRM KOBARID, SLOVENIA

    ‘While I’m not a fan of signature dishes, I always order seabass carpaccio followed by pašta po mornarsko, an amazing clam spaghetti, at Topli Val in Kobarid, the town closest to my restaurant. It’s pure comfort food for me and I’ll often go there with my laptop to work.’

    CROCKERY FROM CHIANG MAI, THAILAND

    ‘I once found some beautiful plates with oyster surfaces in a market in Chiang Mai. Sadly, only half survived the journey back, but I still use them to serve up a sweetbread-stuffed squid dish.’


    SPICES FROM TURKEY

    ‘I always return home with spices from Istanbul’s street stalls. I fall in love with the different aromas – though when it comes to blending them, they sometimes end up proving useless. There’s one, I think it’s called chicken-salad mix, which is fiery and has plenty of cardamom – delicious.’


    OLIVE-WOOD SPOONS FROM MOROCCO

    ‘I adore browsing the stores and markets in Fez. It feels like stepping back 300 years. And I particularly love the handcrafted olive-wood cooking utensils you find all over.’

    hisafranko.com

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Rasmus Munk

    The young-gun dane known for his provocative plates, including one which led 1,500 people to sign up to become organ donors, is now planning an immersive six-hour, 50-course supper

    WOODLICE FROM MY GARDEN, COPENHAGEN

    ‘Not many people know that woodlice are crustaceans. They’re related to shrimps and lobsters, and contain many of the same proteins. Shrimp production and consumption are huge, but no one thinks to eat the little roly-polys found in flowerbeds everywhere. A Danish biologist friend encouraged me to try them fried with garlic. I couldn’t believe it – they tasted just like shrimps. Since then I’ve made a tom yum soup with them.’

    ATTA FLOUR FROM KAKAMEGA, KENYA

    ‘On a recent visit to rural Kenya I had these amazing Indian-inspired chapati breads made with atta flour, salt and water. The flour is milled from durum wheat and more finely ground than most Western-style wholewheat versions. The mix is folded and flattened many times, then fried in a steel pan to make a bread with a multitude of layers. It’s light and silky, and delicious with ox stew or on its own.’

    SAKE KASU FROM NARA, JAPAN

    ‘The sediment, or lees, left over from sake production can be made into a yeasty cooking paste. I’d never encountered anything like it – intense and caramelised, both creamy and with a fermented tang. I’ve now created a sake kasu ice cream.’

    POLYSIPHONIA LANOSA ALGAE FROM HENNE STRAND, DENMARK

    ‘Foraged on the west coast of Jutland, this seaweed is really special. Once dehydrated and fried, it’s 100 per cent like truffle, so can be used as an interesting alternative to truffle oil.’

    OOLONG TEA FROM THE WUYI MOUNTAINS, CHINA

    ‘Tea in Denmark is served with lots of milk and honey, which masks the aroma. It was a real eye-opener to see how different tea culture is in China, where little is added. It can have as much depth as wine and almost taste alcoholic. Oolong is rich and umami-flavoured, and kind of earthy – it works well in stocks.’

    SOURSOP FROM ANTIGUA

    ‘This Caribbean fruit is green and spiky on the outside, with white flesh inside – a little like a lychee but with a tinge of vanilla. It’s unique. I use it for a fruity take on a Ferrero Rocher: pureed flesh in the middle, a layer of seeds and a thin chocolate coating.’

    COW’S UDDER FROM ODENSE, DENMARK

    ‘I stumbled across this at Kildegaarden, the farm that supplies our meat. The udder isn’t normally cooked – it contains raw milk bacteria so usually goes to waste, but prepared in a certain way it’s safe to eat. If you sous-vide and then bake it, it can be grated like cheese. Because it’s meat it doesn’t melt in the same way, but it has beautiful Parmesan-like notes.’

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    YOTAM OTTOLENGHI

    The Israeli-born super-cook who brought the Middle East to our tables shares his shopping list

    BIBER SALCASI RED CHILLI PASTE FROM ISTANBUL

    ‘You can be pretty liberal with this chilli paste. It’s not as spicy as harissa but is way more punchy than passata. It’s a real cheat ingredient and is brilliant just stirred through scrambled eggs. I stock up on it at the Eminönü Egyptian spice bazaar every time I’m in Istanbul and advise all my friends do the same.’

    BRULEE TART FROM SYDNEY

    ‘Bourke Street Bakery is my first stop when I’m visiting the city. Its fresh ginger crème brûlée tarts are perfection. Runny spiced custard, brittle caramel and a light, crisp pastry. The secret is the high proportion of water in the dough.’

    BLUE FENUGREEK FROM GEORGIA

    ‘I discovered this in a vegetable market in Kutaisi on a recent trip to western Georgia. They use the herb a lot there in stews and meat marinades. The flavour is really interesting – sweet and nutty like fenugreek, but a lot more subtle – it’s almost hay-like.’

    SAUSAGE ROLLS FROM LONDON

    ‘The ones from The Ginger Pig are utterly irresistible. I like to sneak a couple into the picnic bag when we’re heading to the park or warm them at home for brunch. The pastry is buttery and flaky and the sausage herby and rich.’

    VERJUICE FROM SOUTH AUSTRALIA

    ‘This is an ingredient that I wish more people cooked with: it’s made from the juice of semi-ripe and unfermented wine grapes. It’s tart and acidic but not at all harsh. It’s a great replacement for lemon or vinegar and I use it in all sorts of dressings and sauces.’

    MECHOUI FROM MARRAKECH

    ‘I’d been told that I had to order this dish from the restaurant Al Fassia in advance and thank goodness for the tip. The slow-roasted lamb, cooked in the women-only kitchen, was beyond melt-in-the-mouth perfection.’

    CITRUS JUICER FROM NEW YORK

    ‘Rare is the day that I don’t use my lemon squeezer. I find this particular one by Chef’n so much more ergonomic and purposeful than other makes – I don’t know what I’d do without it.’

    CROISSANTS FROM MELBOURNE

    ‘My friend and co-author Helen Goh raved about the croissants from Lune Croissanterie so much that I wasn’t sure they could live up to expectation. I needn’t have worried – the queues outside the bakery are not for nothing – this is the croissant that should act as the prototype for all others.’

    VIETNAMESE PANCAKES FROM HANOI

    ‘Eating outside always makes food taste better and I love the central garden at Quán An Ngon in Hanoi. There’s a massive menu with all sorts of Asian flavours, but the Vietnamese bánh xèo pancakes have to be my favourite.’

    FLAT WHITE FROM LONDON

    ‘The Coffee Jar is at the end of my road in Camden. I’m just jammy that my neighbourhood café happens to be serving some of the best coffee in town. I pop in most days for a cup – and a snack, if I’m with my kids.’

    These are Yotam Ottolenghi’s favourite restaurants in the world

    Ottolenghi’s restaurants worth flying for

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Francis Mallmann

    The Argentine king of fire who champions cooking over smouldering wood everywhere from his remote Patagonian island to Chateau la Coste in France

    SWEETBREADS FROM ARGENTINA

    Mollejas, as we call them in Spanish, come from the thymus gland of young cattle and are the most delicious part of a cow. The best ones, of course, are reared in Argentina and must be slowly grilled on charcoal with lemon to turn them into delicious, crunchy little nuggets.’

    ANCHO REYES LIQUEUR FROM PUEBLA, MEXICO

    ‘This spicy, smoky-sweet drink is made from the area’s famous crop, the ancho chilli, which is steeped in sugar-cane spirit. Drink at midnight beside a bonfire, holding the hand of a beautiful woman.’

    WILD-FENNEL POLLEN FROM TUSCANY

    ‘Before grilling my pig cuts, I rub them with this pollen while listening to Alfredo Catalani’s La Wally opera and his aria Ebben? Ne Andró Lontana, sung by Maria Callas. It’s been a treasured ingredient in Tuscany for centuries.’

    CHATEAU MUSAR WINE FROM LEBANON

    ‘I am always on the lookout for the 1967 vintage from the Hochar family vineyard in Ghazir, Bekaa Valley. I like to think you can taste the lust and pride of the hills of this ancient country in every sip of the elegant wine, which is mostly made with Cabernet Sauvignon grapes.’

    VARIETIES OF RICE FROM VIETNAM

    ‘On my way from Hanoi to Halong Bay, I bought a bag of traditional floating-rice seeds, which are grown in the acid-sulfate and saline soil of the flooded fields of the Mekong Delta. Floating rice has a very long stem that keeps it above the water’s surface. It makes for a unique taste.’

    PANDAN LEAVES FROM THE PHILIPPINES

    ‘These are just the thing to add to basmati rice; they give it a heavenly flavour. I brought some seeds back from Pamalican Island to grow my own.’

    CIGARS FROM CUBA

    ‘Not edible, but I allow myself one a day when grilling meat for hours or after dinner. It’s worth visiting Vuelta Abajo, where you can see women roll tobacco leaves grown in rich, red soil along the bumpy roads.’

    FOOD CULTURE FROM PARIS

    ‘I found the most important ingredient of my life in the French capital. It’s something so difficult and takes so long to learn or explain: it’s the attitude and respect for food in this country and its culinary traditions that are present in my thoughts every time I light a fire.’

    See our video with Chef Francis Mallmann in Patagonia

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  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    René Redzepi

    The founder and head chef of Noma in Copenhagen is famously obsessed with foraging for local and seasonal ingredients

    COD FROM GREENLAND

    ‘I will never forget the first time I had a 25kg cod fish from the icy waters of a town called Ilulissat. It was like biting into a piece of lobster with that meatiness and texture on your teeth – I’ve never had a piece of cod like that before and it will always be the cod of my life.’


    HONEYPOT ANTS FROM AUSTRALIA

    ‘This ant is basically the living food supply for the rest of the colony. They live off other insects and any greenery, and then process the food into a liquid that is stored for the rest of the group. They look like a perfect little blueberries, and that sweet mouthful is unforgettable.’


    CHICKEN BROTH FROM COPENHAGEN

    ‘My wife and I roast a chicken every Sunday, and from the bones we cook a big pot of stock which we drink during the week. It’s flavoured with chicken wing garum, a liquid that tastes a bit like all those sticky bits you find at the bottom of the roasting dish.’


    HABANERO CHILLI FROM MEXICO

    ‘This chilli has a fruitiness that’s similar to a bell pepper, and it’s that vegetable note, with the heat, that I’ve never found in any other. When Noma popped up in Tulum I would chop these chillis straight into lemon juice and then sprinkle on to roast pork.’

    YUZU FROM JAPAN

    ‘This is, hands down, the most unique citrus flavour. The juice is lemony, but the peel is aromatic and fragrant, and really doesn’t compare to anything else. It’s so distinct it’s instantly recognisable.’

    REINDEER FROM LAPLAND

    ‘In the northern parts of the region the Sámi people eat reindeer. I would choose it over beef any day. These animals live off mushrooms and lichen and berries, so the meat has a flavour that’s similar to venison but so tender that you could spoon it without any need for a knife.’

    SEA URCHINS FROM THE FAROE ISLANDS

    ‘The best I’ve ever tasted were at Koks restaurant in Leynavatn. The urchins were so fresh – straight from the sea – served with just a dash of salt. They were like eating homemade custard with an oceanic brine. When it comes to an outstanding experience, this cliffside cabin tops everything else. The langoustines, boiled in seawater, were unbelievable, too.’

    Read our Osteria Francescana’s Massimo Bottura: interview

    Massimo Bottura, the world’s best chef, shares his foodie finds

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Gaston Acurio

    The chef behind Lima’s groundbreaking Astrid y Gaston, who introduced ceviche to the masses, on his fantasy shopping list

    ANCHOVIES FROM CANTABRIA

    ‘When I’m in Spain, I always try to make it to Cantabria, where they have the most wonderful canned anchovies. Don Bocarte are my favourite: they’re generously sized, delicate, subtle and intense, all at the same time. Take some good bread, toast it and top it with avocado or tomato before finishing with an anchovy.’

    CHINESE SAUSAGES FROM NEW YORK

    ‘These seriously delicious sausages are made by hand every day in


    this small store in Chinatown called Sun Ming Jan. I recommend the ones made with duck liver and a touch of gin — simply unforgettable.’

    POTATOES FROM THE ANDES

    ‘The best potatoes and tubers in the world are the ones from farmer Edilberto Soto Tenorio in the Andes. You can’t imagine all the colours: purple, red, blue, yellow, orange and black… not to mention the amazing earthy flavours. I bake them in the earth they’re grown in, so I buy soil from the mountains too.’

    MOLLETE DE PAPADA FROM BARCELONA

    ‘One of the most talented chefs in the world, Albert Adria, makes this sandwich for his tasting menu at Tickets in Barcelona — homemade bread that’s like a muffin, stuffed with braised pork jowl marinated with Spanish flavours.’

    SEA URCHINS FROM MARCONA BEACH

    ‘These huge sea urchins, from a small area in the Pacific Ocean south of Peru, are just incredible. They’re caught by a community of fishermen, the Marcona, and they are creamy, sweet, elegant and almost erotic. Massimo Bottura agrees they’re the best, and they’re sustainable too. I serve them at Astrid y Gaston.’

    STEAK FROM BUENOS AIRES

    ‘Everyone should try a bife de chorizo (stirloin strip steak) at Don Julio Parrilla in Buenos Aires. It’s a very traditional restaurant where the meat comes from free-range gaucho cows in the Pampa province. It’s sensational.’

    J’AIME PARIS BY ALAIN DUCASSE

    ‘This is not a book of recipes, it’s a gift from a hugely successful chef — a list of the top places to eat in Paris. It makes every reader’s trip to the city a foodie adventure.’

    VODKA FROM PERU

    ’14 lnkas is the first vodka made from Peruvian potatoes, and it has


    a slightly sweet flavour with tropical-fruit aromas. I love it.’

    Read our interview with Anthony Bourdain

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  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Dan Hunter

    The chef, whose Australian restaurant Brae appears in the World’s 50 Best list, reveals his kitchen favourites

    COD THROAT FROM THE BASQUE COUNTRY

    ‘I lived in San Sebastián for two years and will never forget when I tried kokotxas de bacalao, grilled over grape vines and washed down with local wine. The throat is one of the most sought-after parts of a cod, and the salt-cured technique was a delicious revelation.’

    SHARP THINGS FROM TOKYO

    ‘Knives, graters, iron scissors – the lot. Japan specialises in knives and other cooking equipment. I’ve got so many utensils that I’ve picked up in Tokyo’s Kitchen Town (Kappabashi-dori). My favourite is a small handmade brass grater for zesting citrus.’

    OAXACA CHEESE FROM MEXICO

    ‘There’s this pulled cheese from Oaxaca that’s a bit like mozzarella and I ate it every day when I was in Mexico. You can find it all over the country sprinkled on tacos and melted in quesadillas. It’s brilliant in sandwiches too – especially with pork and jalapeños.’

    BIRD’S-BEAK PEPPERS FROM BRAZIL

    ‘When I visited São Paulo last year, I was served some pimenta biquinho. I’d never seen these funny round-but-pointy peppers before, and I really enjoyed their fruity flavour. It’s a nice change from blistering heat.’

    PISCO FROM PERU

    ‘Of course, many people are familiar with Pisco Sours, but in Peru the spirit is elevated beyond expectation. One night in Lima at Maido, a Nikkei restaurant (a Peruvian-Japanese style of cooking), I ate a menu completely matched to an incredible array of pisco-based cocktails. Fabulous.’

    BOMBA RICE FROM VALENCIA

    ‘The first time I ate bomba short-grain rice I freaked out. I couldn’t believe how precise the result was – the rice wasn’t overdeveloped or wet and sloppy at all. The village of El Palmar in Valencia is the most brilliant spot to try it as it’s the home of paella.’

    ‘WILD FOOD PLANTS OF AUSTRALIA’ BY TIM LOW

    ‘There are so many wild food species in Australia that this guide is a hugely helpful insight. It’s full of regional diagrams, which are very useful – frankly I’m not sure what I’d do without it.’

    GLASS SAKE BOTTLES FROM KYOTO

    ‘I found a gallery selling really beautiful hand-blown glassware when I was in Kyoto. There was an exhibition showcasing different artisans from around Japan and I bought some incredible bottles that we now use in the restaurant to serve our non-alcoholic drinks pairing from.’

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Clare Smyth

    The first British woman to win three Michelin stars was recently voted the world’s best female chef. Here are her European finds

    NATIVE OYSTERS FROM LOCH RYAN IN SCOTLAND

    ‘These are only in season in months with the letter “R”, but they have a wonderful, meaty flavour. I usually eat them at Bentley’s Oyster Bar & Grill in London, served with lemonand white pepper, and accompanied by a glass of Champagne.’


    BAROLO VINEGAR FROM PIEDMONT

    ‘This Italian vinegar packs a real kick and is perfect for finishing a rich dish. People get confused with Barolo and balsamic, but Barolo is very different – it isn’t so sweet but much sharper. I use it with risotto, pasta or any rich, creamy, butter-based plate.’

    PERIGORD TRUFFLES FROM FRANCE

    ‘Truffles are right up there with my top ingredients. The Périgord black truffle has a strong, aromatic smell and a slightly peppery, bitter taste. You can buy them in most quality delis and markets. Yes, they’re expensive but they’re versatile and worth it. I love them best served shaved, raw on top of pasta or on scrambled eggs.’


    PINTXOS FROM SAN SEBASTIAN

    ‘From kokotxas [fish cheeks] and Ibérico ham to ceps a la plancha, I adore these tapas from northern Spain. My very favourite pintxos place in San Sebastián is Bar Txepetxa – they serve an incredible array of anchovies.’

    CANELES FROM BORDEAUX

    ‘My team would never forgive me if I returned from Bordeaux without these small French pastries. I usually get them from Le Grand Hôtel, but there are lots of specialist shops selling them across the city. They are crispy on the outside, soft in the middle and taste like caramel.’


    LEMONS FROM AMALFI

    ‘These are simply the best lemons – they are big and sweet, and grow all over the region. They’re a real treat. The leaves can also be used for cooking: wrap fish in them and grill the parcels on the barbecue.’


    GRAND LIVRE DE CUISINE BY ALAIN DUCASSE

    ‘Alain Ducasse is one of the greatest chefs in history, and this book reminds me of my time working at his restaurant, Le Louis XV in Monaco. It’s an encyclopaedia, really, with hundreds of brilliant recipes, and it’s followed me through my career since.’

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    ALEX ATALA

    The Brazilian punk-and-DJ-turned-super-chef who brought the food of the rainforest into the mainstream shares his shopping list

    TUCUPI FROM PARA, BRAZIL

    ‘The Amazonian culture revolves around one amazing ingredient: tucupi. I was fascinated the first time I tasted this juice, which is extracted from manioc flour. It’s inedible when raw, but once boiled – for a very long time – it’s fine. The yellow sauce is rich and tangy. If miso is the taste of Japan, tucupi is the taste of Brazil.’

    PERCEBES FROM GALICIA

    ‘The sea produces all sorts of good memories for me, but there is one thing in particular that I’m always on the lookout for: percebes gallegos, or Galician barnacles. They are unique to Portugal and Spain, truly outstanding – a cross between lobster and clam.’

    ALIGOT FROM AVEYRON, FRANCE

    ‘Every great chef I have ever met has given me an incredible recipe. I can’t mention Michel Bras and not talk about this smooth, cheesy potato dish, made with garlic, butter and cream. This recipe was definitely a turning point in my career and I have to pay respect to him for that.’

    YANOMAMI MUSHROOMS FROM RORAIMA, BRAZIL

    ‘This is another astonishing Amazonian find. The only people who can tell which ones are poisonous are the Yanomami tribe. And it’s this fact, along with their indescribable smoky flavour, that I find so intriguing.’

    HUITLACOCHE FROM MEXICO

    ‘Mexican truffle, or huitlacoche, is basically a deformed corn spike infected with a fungus that produces dark and swollen grains. When fresh, it is soft and velvety with an earthy taste, and one of the country’s finest ingredients.’

    CATAPLANA COOKING PAN FROM PORTUGAL

    ‘No pot represents a country as well as the cataplana. It’s shaped like a clam, with two domed halves, and the best ones are made from copper. It’s associated with seafood, but you can use it to smoke almost anything.’

    PARILLA GRILL FROM URUGUAY

    ‘There is only a slight difference between the Argentinian and Uruguayan parrillas – the latter uses hot coals not charcoal – but I hope everyone has a chance to eat a steak grilled on a Uruguayan parrilla at least once.’

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Tom Kerridge

    You have to wait a year for a table at his restaurant, The Hand and Flowers in Marlow. Here the first chef to win two Michelin Stars for pub grub picks his favourite things

    LARDO FROM ITALY

    ‘Lardo is made by curing strips of fatback with rosemary and other herbs and spices, and Colonnata is the best place in all of Italy to buy it. Every shop in this tiny mountainside village is full of pork fat! My favourite way to eat lardo is simply spread on hot bread. It’s amazing.’

    SRIRACHA SAUCE FROM NEW YORK

    ‘I first came across this in NYC a few years ago – since then it’s become much more mainstream. It’s a spicy sauce made with dried chillies and is delicious with sandwiches and cold meats. I love it. There’s a secret cocktail bar in New York, The Garret, which serves a great sriracha-sauce burger.’

    COFFEE FROM REYKJAVIK

    ‘Not just the beans. If I could steal the whole Icelandic café culture, I would. Locals sit outside coffee shops wrapped in blankets even though it’s -4°C. I’ve never had more fun than people-watching in Reykjavik while sipping a good, strong filter coffee.’

    RESTAURANT FRANTZEN IN STOCKHOLM

    ‘A number of years ago I ate the most inspirational tasting menu at Björn Frantzén’s restaurant. When I arrived the bread dough was proving in a box on my table. It was then whisked away and cooked in a very hot oven while the butter was hand-churned under my nose. I bought a copy of his cookbook on my way out – it has phenomenal pictures but sadly I can’t read it as it’s all in Swedish.’

    DURIAN FRUIT FROM SINGAPORE

    ‘This has to be the smelliest fruit in the world. It’s banned in hotels and on airplanes because of the stench, but it’s a flavour that everyone should try at least once. Neither acidic, sweet nor juicy, it’s rich and custard-y and the more you eat the less likely you are to stop.’

    PINTXOS FROM SAN SEBASTIAN

    ‘The northern Spanish tradition of cocktail-sticked bar snacks is brilliant. It’s such an informal way to eat. I like the idea that people can turn up, have one or two bites, or indeed spend all night picking at the best jamón. This was part of the concept behind my second and much more relaxed restaurant in Marlow, The Coach.’

    ASADOR FROM ARGENTINA

    ‘This is a kind of barbecue with a wood and coal pit to one side. The hot coals drop down and then get pushed underneath the grill. I love the set-up so much I had one made for my house. You can’t beat salted pork ribs slow-cooked over the asador in summer. The combination of sunshine and smoky flavours is incredible.’

    FETA CHEESE FROM CYPRUS

    ‘It may sound simple but a great feta that’s been marinated in olive oil and dry herbs tastes fantastic and brings so much to dishes. I’m a huge fan of Greek food, and Cypriot cooking when done well is some of the best in the world. I use feta all the time as a seasoning. It works on pretty much anything instead of salt.’

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Angela Hartnett

    Her Michelin-starred Murano in Mayfair serves up some of the best Italian cook in London, the chef reveals her kitchen finds

    GELATO FROM MELBOURNE

    ‘Pidapip6 is the most wonderful ice-cream shop. It was recommended to me as a must-visit in Melbourne. I loved it so much that I bought its book, Gelato Eight Days a Week, and now use the recipes in my restaurant — fior di latte and chocolate are my go-tos.’

    LE RICETTE REGIONAL! ITALIANE FROM BOLOGNA

    ‘This is the absolute best cookery book, a bible of Italian food, though it has never been translated into English. My aunt had a copy that I used to pore over when visiting her. There are lots of recipes for one classic dish, each version from a different region in Italy. It’s quite magical.’

    SALUMI FROM LYON

    ‘When my partner, Neil, was working in Lyon for Anne-Sophie Pic we would go to all the best restaurants in the region, but it was the markets that got me. Salumi was my favourite find. I came across one in Saint-Antoine market with whole walnuts going through the middle of it. It’s pretty hard to beat.’

    KNIVES FROM JAPAN

    ‘There’s an area in Tokyo called Kappabashi, or Kitchen Town, that is packed with cook shops. One road is made up entirely of knife shops. The traders will teach you all about the person behind each blade — making the object even more special. I bought so many things when I was there that I needed an extra suitcase.’

    PASTA-CUTTERS FROM FLORENCE

    ‘Most years we go to Tuscany on a truffle trip with chef friends. It’s brilliant fun and we eat well, of course. There’s a kitchen shop near the central market, San Lorenzo, that we absolutely love. I bought a range of fantastic pasta-cutters handmade in brass and wood. There was one for pretty much every type of pasta going.’

    TABLEWARE FROM SAN FRANCISCO

    ‘The craftwork at the Heath Ceramics shop is incredible. When I was in the USA I spotted that Alice Waters uses its stuff, and then I saw it at Tartine restaurant too — so it’s definitely up there. I have brought plates, bowls and mugs back home because you can’t beat this place.’

    BALSAMIC VINEGAR FROM MODENA

    ‘On one fast-and-furious trip, I saw how balsamic vinegar is made. This is aged for at least 25 years and is one of three protected balsamic recipes.

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    VIRGILIO MARTINEZ

    His flagship restaurant Central in Lima is ranked 6th in the world; while his latest culinary project is 11,500 feet above sea level in Peru’s mountains

    MARAS SALT FROM THE SACRED VALLEY

    ‘I spend a lot of my time in Peru tracking down new ingredients. Maras is between Cusco and Machu Picchu and, since Inca times, famous for its salt evaporation ponds. It’s known for its pale pink colour and intense flavour – I add it to dried airampo fruit, pictured centre.’

    ‘A NEW NAPA CUISINE’ COOKBOOK FROM CALIFORNIA

    ‘Last year I went to cook at Christopher Kostow’s restaurant. I’ve always been curious about Napa Valley cooking – when I first started out I was looking at books from chefs like Thomas Keller. But this is avant-garde, mixing a modern French approach with ultra-local, farm-to-table ingredients.’

    SAMACA OLIVE OIL FROM PERU

    ‘Most people don’t know you can get Peruvian olive oil, but this one from the south is a real discovery.’

    LIMO PEPPERS FROM SPAIN

    ‘The DNA of Peruvian cuisine is yellow chilli, the aji amarillo, but for our London restaurant I get limo peppers from near Madrid. They come in red and green, and are spicier than amarillos – I use them in ceviche.’

    SMALL CREPE SAUTE PAN FROM E DEHILLERIN IN PARIS

    ‘This shop in the centre of Paris is crammed with all sorts of beautiful small pots and pans. I take a little frying pan with me everywhere – I can make a fire and cook anything on it when I’m camping or travelling.’

    GRANADILLA JUICE FROM THE ANDES

    ‘There are 16 or 17 types of passion fruit in Peru, but the granadilla is a very sweet one. I love its structure and the way you open it with your hands. For one glass of juice you need about 15 fruit!’

    SHUN BREAD KNIFE FROM TOKYO

    ‘The Japanese do the best knives, and a chef I worked with at my restaurant Central in Lima gave me this when he came back from a trip. I’ve never experienced such a sharp knife – it slips through loaves like butter.’

    WOODEN CUTTING BOARD FROM CUSCO

    ‘My mother gave me a large chopping board seven years ago, made from local pinewood. I use it to serve meat for everyone to share – it’s very rustic and not beautiful, but I have a strong emotional attachment to it.’

    COBRA HEART FROM THAILAND

    ‘This is the weirdest thing I’ve ever eaten on my travels. It wasn’t nice, but it was an interesting experience – as cooks we have to try as many things as we can.’

    Check out Virgilio Martínez’s restaurant: Mil, Peru

    Is this the ultimate destination restaurant?

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Ruthie Rogers

    The revered River Café chef, who has been on top of the London restaurant game for 31 years, shares her foodie finds

    FRITTO MISTO FROM LIGURIA

    ‘One of my favourite places in Italy is Vernazza on Italy’s north-west coast. My very good friend Gianni Franzi owns a restaurant there and the dish I usually order is fritto misto, with squid, shrimp and anchovies. It’s so light because it is made with hardly any flour. An instant reminder that you’ve arrived at the seaside.’

    SALTED ANCHOVIES FROM NORTHERN SPAIN

    ‘These are a real staple in Italian cooking and a major seasoning ingredient. At the restaurant we make a simple anchovy, olive-oil and rosemary pasta which is delicious. Anchovies are also brilliant on top of a Dover sole, or as a sauce for monkfish. I buy them from Spain’s Conservas Ortiz — they’re caught on


    a rod and line from the Bay of Biscay.’

    DRIED CHILLIES FROM MEXICO

    ‘Mexican cooking is often perceived as complex, but when I first visited the country, I was surprised by how light and delicate the flavours are. I love how chilli is added to scrambled eggs in huevos a la mexicana. We go to Puerto Escondido every Christmas, and I always bring dried chillies back with me.’

    CUTLERY FROM DENMARK

    ‘I met my husband [the architect Richard Rogers] in the 1970s, and the knives and forks he had were by the furniture designer Arne Jacobsen. We’ve used them ever since. They have a very classic, elegant design — they’re flat, and the knives are just one piece of steel with a matte finish that’s not ostentatious at all.’

    CHEESE GRATER FROM ITALY

    ‘I’m a fan of Alessi, particularly this grater. It’s the combination of the solidity of the wood with the steel; grating good Parmesan with this is magic. Playful and pretty — I’ve included one in our Christmas hampers.’

    LENTILS FROM LE PUY, FRANCE

    ‘I lived in Paris for a while when Richard was building the Centre Pompidou and I still use lots of French ingredients. At the River Cafe we cook with Italian Castelluccio lentils, but at home we have Puy — in the summer, I add mozzarella, olive oil and herbs and in the winter, beef and mustard. I love the very nutty taste.’

    MEASUREMENT CUPS FROM THE USA

    ‘I’m American and when I first came to London I found it unbelievably frustrating to be using teaspoons and tablespoons. There are still some recipes that I need American measurements for, such as the classic New York cheesecake I make at Thanksgiving.’

    OLIVE OIL FROM CHIANTI

    ‘Every November we take a group of chefs to Italy to see the olive oil being made for the cafe. It’s possibly the most important ingredient, and we import thousands and thousands of bottles per year. We have four different producers, in Chianti and just outside Florence.’

    COUSCOUS FROM MOROCCO

    ‘Once a year we go to Marrakech and eat a lot of couscous — a simple vegetable version with carrots, leeks and harissa sauce is the best. Le Jardin and Terrasse des Epices are my top restaurants in the city.’

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Joan Roca

    Girona’s three-Michelin-starred El Celler de Can Roca has taken over from El Bulli as the hottest restaurant in Spain, with a waiting time of 11 months for a table

    SEA ANEMONE FROM COSTA BRAVA

    ‘The sea-urchin population on our Spanish coast has severely decreased over the years, so we’ve started using a local sea anemone instead. It has such a brilliant and intense oceanic flavour, it’s like a cross between a sea urchin and an oyster.’

    PIURA PORCELENA COCOA BEANS FROM PERU

    ‘Grown in wild regions of northern Peru, this white cocoa bean has the most refreshing flavour of any cocoa I’ve tasted. It’s not bitter at all, but there’s a playful sour note, and it makes a very rich buttery chocolate.’

    HORMIGAS CULONAS FROM COLOMBIA

    ‘These translate as ‘ants with a large ass’. I came across them during our restaurant’s first world tour. They’re rare and quite expensive but a great snack – salty and crunchy with an intense umami flavour.’

    PASSION FRUIT FROM THAILAND

    ‘Of course, you can get passion fruit all over the world nowadays, but the ones I tasted just outside Chiang Mai are a stunning combination of sweetness and acidity, the finest I’ve ever tasted.’

    JAMON IBERICO FROM ANDALUCIA

    ‘This cured ham from Sierra de Aracena in southern Spain has the perfect balance of fat marbling. It’s my brother Jordi’s favourite thing in the world. He used to eat it in secret until my mother caught him, age nine, spoiling an impeccable flat cut as he attempted to slice the leg on his own.’

    TEMPEH FROM INDONESIA

    ‘Made from fermented soy beans, tempeh has such a delicious earthy flavour and it’s even healthier than tofu. Tasting the Indonesian variety made me want to develop tempeh using one of the best ingredients we have in Catalonia: the Santa Pau white bean. The results are very exciting.’

    PRICKLY PEARS FROM CATALONIA

    ‘A fruit of the cactus family, prickly pears are actually considered an invasive weed and have been threatening other plant species on the coast of Cap de Creus in the region for a long time. We decided to try and take action by incorporating them on the restaurant menu and discovered they have a subtle taste a bit like raspberries mixed with watermelon.’

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Andre Chiang

    The Taiwanese star trained with restaurant greats including Joel Robuchon and sailed through Michelin-starred joints since the age of 15

    SWEET POTATOES FROM TAIWAN

    ‘The shape of Taiwan looks exactly like a sweet potato, and the best ones come from my hometown. My favourite way to bake them is in unkilned red clay mixed with all kinds of fresh herbs. This year I added salted egg yolk to a sweet-potato dish – it was delicious.’

    CHARCOAL FROM JAPAN

    ‘I have to admit, I get a kick out of charcoal. It’s black, hot and sexy. I’m obsessed with cooking on the stuff, and the ultimate happiness would be if I could just eat it neat. I use charcoal to infuse oils and bake a sort of doughy bread. It’s also great as a base for spicy laksa soup.’

    SEAWATER FROM THE ATLANTIC OCEAN

    ‘Unlike sweet things, salt is underrated by a lot of people. I feel it has so many dimensions and you can really appreciate it when using real seawater. I source mine off the coast of Brittany and use it to cook, cure, marinate, clarify and make jelly.’

    SOY SAUCE FROM TAIPEI

    ‘I probably love soy sauce because I love salt. The best is made with anchovies and other fish as well as soybeans. Last year I met a guy in Taiwan whose recipe is beautiful. His family have been making it for 150 years, but sadly they only make enough for locals. ’

    AYAM CEMANI CHICKEN FROM INDONESIA

    ‘Almost all ingredients in Singapore are imported because the island itself has an extremely small land mass. This particular species of chicken is hard to come by, but is the tastiest in Asia. It makes an incredibly striking impact due to its grey-black flesh and juicy texture.’

    PORCELAIN FROM ARITA

    ‘Arita was the first place in Japan to produce porcelain, about 400 years ago. The ideal way to understand the beauty of Japanese ceramics is to visit the town. Pottery has been a passion of mine since I was a child, and if I wasn’t a chef I would definitely be a ceramicist.’

    COFFEE FROM SINGAPORE

    ‘Nylon Coffee Roasters is René Redzepi’s favourite café. Need I say more? When Redzepi came to Singapore, we stopped by here every single day and drank three cups each time. It’s tucked away in a residential building and serves amazing filter coffee and espresso.’

    YAKITORI FROM OSAKA

    ‘This traditional Japanese skewered chicken is slow-grilled over fire. At a secret spot in Osaka called Ichimatsu, there are only six seats and you’re served by chef Hideto Takeda, whose grilling technique is perfection.’

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Gaggan Annand

    The Kolkata-born chef, best known for the 25-course emoji menu at his eponymous Bangkok restaurant, shares his shopping list

    BIRD’S-EYE CHILLIES FROM THAILAND

    ‘You know I like chillies, right? I can’t imagine a bite without a chilli pepper: it’s the most important ingredient in the world. Bird’s-eye chillies are fresh, tasty and hot, and I get them from Pak Khlong Talat, one of the most famous markets in Bangkok.’

    SEA URCHINS FROM JAPAN

    ‘Sea urchin, or uni, from Hokkaido are particularly sweet, although cooking with them is like blasphemy in Indian cuisine. I do it anyway: I like to make fun out of these sorts of rules — in fact, I’ll make sure I do something unconventional, like mixing them with mango.’

    LAMB CURRY FROM BUENOS AIRES

    ‘When I visited Argentina in 2017, I ate at Gran Dabbang in BA. It was amazing as the chef, Mariano Ramon, has no relationship with India, yet is experimenting with curries and spicing. His lamb, made with black spices and tomato, is cooked with star anise, cinnamon, cardamom and ginger, and it’s mind-blowing.’

    STREET FOOD FROM VARDAAN, KOLKATA

    ‘Food in Kolkata is very different from most Indian food — it actually has a lot of British influence, but it’s still under-explored. There’s certainly more to it than kebabs and naan bread. When I’m there, I take a map and cover so much in two days that I might well get a stomach upset — you might not believe me, but the flavours are worth it.’

    HOJICHA ROASTED GREEN TEA FROM KYOTO

    ‘I’m a tea lover. The stem of this green tea is roasted rather than steamed, which makes it very special. I serve hojicha during the four-flavour tofu-cream dessert tasting — matcha, chocolate, rum and raisin and pistachio — at my new Bangkok restaurant Mihara Tofuten.’

    INSTANT NOODLE CUPS FROM SOUTH ASIA

    ‘At home, I have a whole shelf dedicated to instant noodles; I love them. Wherever I travel around South Asia, I buy ramen, Indian noodles, Maggi noodles. I’m just a massive noodle fan — from pasta to ramen. I also collect handmade spice pastes and often throw one into a cup to brighten it up.’

    CHOPSTICKS FROM OITA PREFECTURE, KYUSHU

    ‘Although I usually eat with my hands, I do have fancy chopsticks that are thin, light and very comfortable. These Japanese hashi are handcrafted and very traditional; a pair costs about £25.’

    These are the best restaurants in Bangkok

    The best restaurants in Bangkok

  • David Muñoz

    He’s trained at Nobu and Hakkasan and his Madrid joint Diverxo has racked up three Michelin stars. Now the Spaniard is taking on London with his mind-blowing opening, Streetxo. Here are his top foodie travel finds

    AJI AMARILLO FROM PERU

    ‘This is the most complex, aromatic and unique chilli around. If you


    have ever eaten Peruvian food, you will have tried it. Usually bright orange and thick fleshed, each one has a flavour that’s a little different. It’s not outrageously spicy, but has a beautiful fruity sort of heat.’

    ROBATA GRILL FROM JAPAN

    ‘I remember the first time I sat at the counter of a Japanese restaurant


    in New York, I was amazed by their use of an open fire. Seafood and vegetables are skewered and then slow-cooked over hot charcoal; it


    is completely different to how we cook in Spain – it’s fantastic.’

    DUMPLINGS FROM HONG KONG

    ‘Going for yum cha – dim sum and refreshing Chinese tea – is always an exciting experience. I can eat dozens of dumplings – from shrimp-filled har gau to barbecue-pork char siu bao or the unbelievable xiao long bao: soup dumplings that explode in your mouth.

    SEA URCHIN FROM ASTURIAS, SPAIN

    ‘These full-bodied Spanish red sea urchins are only in season in the winter months, but they are marvellously tasty, with such an incredibly creamy texture and delicate flavour of the sea.’

    LILY BULB FROM CHINA

    ‘Traditionally used in Chinese herbal remedies and the odd stir-fry, the little-known lily bulb is actually a great vegetable. It’s sweet, sour, crunchy, resh and very unusual tasting. I use it all the time and keep finding new ways to incorporate it into my dishes – most recently with pigeon and chorizo on the menu in my new London restaurant.’

    IBERIAN BLACK PIG FROM SPAIN

    ‘A national icon, and in my opinion the best meat to cook with. The marbling is exceptional, and you can eat every single part of the animal because it is so versatile. It works brilliantly whether braised for stew, fried in a wok or simply grilled.’

    YUZU FROM JAPAN

    ‘Citrus fruits are the most useful ingredient in the kitchen – I use them with everything – and for me, yuzu is the king of the family. It’s so powerful that just a few drops elevate anything it’s paired with and completely change the essence.’

    PIGEON RAGOUT FROM ITALY

    ‘This dish was so good it almost made me cry with happiness. Chef Giuseppe Iannotti’s mother cooked it for me at his restaurant Kresios in the Benevento province of Italy, near Naples. The food here is the most exciting and modern in the country.’

    CHILLI CRAB FROM SINGAPORE

    ‘Singapore is the street-food capital of the world. If you eat only one thing, head straight to a hawker centre and order chilli crab with plenty of mantou steamed buns. Just be prepared to get messy.’

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Martin Morales

    The chef who kick-started London’s Peruvian obsession at his restaurant Ceviche reveals his finest kitchen finds

    ACARAJE FROM BRAZIL

    ‘I came across this cheeky, deep-fried, street-food snack during a trip in Salvador’s Pelourinho. Originally from West Africa, acarajé is a gift from the gods: a crunchy, salty, greasy, dirty, black-eyed pea fritter stuffed with okra, shrimp, cashew and a spicy sauce. It’s messy but finger-licking good.’

    LOMO AL TRAPO FROM COLOMBIA

    ‘The plátano con queso at Restaurant Andrés Carne de Res in Chia, near Bogotá, could make you cry with joy, but its lomo al trapo is something else. Translated as “beef tenderloin in a towel”, it’s a steak dish cooked with tons of sea salt, then wrapped in a rag and thrown on a fire.’

    PUMPKIN FLOWERS FROM MEXICO

    ‘The sexiest thing in the country has to be the creamy pumpkin-flower soup. Understated but elegant, it brings a smile to your face whether you’re in a fancy restaurant or a tiny family-run joint. Whenever I see pumpkin flowers in a market I buy them and make this soup for my kids.’

    RIVER PRAWNS FROM PERU

    ‘Carabineros shrimp are generally accepted as the best in the world,


    but these fresh-water prawns give them a run for their money. They’re sweet and aromatic and carry an intense taste which works wonderfully in chupe de camarones – a traditional prawn chowder.’

    BATAN FROM THE ANDES

    ‘The batán consists of a large, moon-shaped boulder and flat grinding stone, which are used like a pestle and mortar to blend ingredients. It’s an ancient technique from the Andes that makes incredible sauces. If I could carry it back to London with me I would treasure it dearly.’

    SERRA DA ESTRELA CHEESE FROM PORTUGAL

    ‘This soft sheep’s cheese, made in the Serra da Estrela mountain range, is buttery with just a hint of maturity. You can buy it at Manteigaria Silva, a brilliant deli in Lisbon that has been around for more than 125 years.’

    BABY SQUID FROM BARCELONA

    ‘Sit at the counter bar in La Medusa 73 at indoor market Ninot for the finest seafood in the Med. Fresh off the boat, baby squid is pan fried in its own ink; it’s full of flavour yet so delicate. I wish I could eat them every Friday night at home, with a cold Somos Libres pale ale.’

    ARTICHOKES FROM JUNIN

    ‘You can see acres of artichokes from the sky as you land at Jauja Airport in central Peru. The heart of each vegetable is the size of a softball; it’s perfect for making artichoke pie or an unusual vegetable ceviche.’

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Jock Zonfrillo

    The Scottish-born chef’s Adelaide restaurant Orana was named best in Austalia for its twist on bush tucker. He shares his favourite kitchen haul

    FERMENTED LAMB FROM THE FAROE ISLANDS

    ‘To make skerpikjet, lamb legs are hung in a shed outside for up to nine months, so the salty ocean air dries them. The taste is incredible: similar to cured meat but without being brined or salted, which means you get the lamb’s true flavour.’

    ANTHILL CHEESE FROM SOUTH AUSTRALIA

    ‘Woodside Cheese Wrights in Adelaide sells this five-day-old chevre, with ground lemon myrtle leaves on the sides and green ants on top. The consistency is creamy with a slight crunch and the citrusy hit from the ants is what makes it.’

    TUNNOCK’S TREATS FROM GLASGOW

    ‘These are my guilty pleasure — caramel wafers, tea cakes and caramel logs — all made by Tunnock’s in Glasgow. There’s a stash hidden in a secret place in our restaurant and if a customer finds it, they get to eat them.’

    BERBERE FROM ETHIOPIA

    ‘This spice mix includes chilli peppers, ginger, nigella and fenugreek. The flavour blew me away and it’s particularly great with meat.’

    GAMONEU CHEESE FROM ASTURIAS, SPAIN

    ‘Queso de Gamoneu is amazing, made in the hills of north-west Spain. It’s


    slightly spicy and a little bit buttery, with this nutty aftertaste. And there’s a soft smokiness that intensifies as it matures.’

    KNIVES FROM ADELAIDE

    ‘I have several from a company called Dog Boy Knives. They’re very cool — each one is hand-crafted from discarded high-carbon steel items such as lawnmower blades.’

    TUCUPI FROM BRAZIL

    ‘This crazy ingredient is extracted from a wild root in the Amazon jungle. Once reduced, it has a taste similar to soy sauce. If I could use it all the time, I would.’

    LORNE SAUSAGE FROM SCOTLAND

    ‘Also known as square sausage, it’s a mixture of minced meat, rusk and spices. Eat it for breakfast with a fried tattie — potato — scone on the side.’

    NATIVE HONEY FROM THE KIMBERLEY, AUSTRALIA

    ‘It’s made by a stingless bee that only survives in warmer climates. They create a small cluster of honey in a droplet, usually outside a tree. Each hive produces less than one litre a year so it’s very precious. We put it in our paperbark ice cream.’

  • 22 of the worlds most influential chefs share their favourite foodie finds

    Skye Gyngell

    The Australian who called the Michelin star she won at the Petersham Nurseries a curse now heads up her own restaurant, Spring, in London’s Somerset House. Here she reveals her suitcase stash

    MURANO GLASSES FROM VENICE

    ‘I first saw these humbug-striped tumblers by Marie Brandolini years ago at a friend’s house. I bought some for myself, but love them so much that we now use them at Spring. They add some much-needed colour – just looking at them gives me pleasure.’


    COCOA POD FROM SAN FRANCISCO

    ‘Before opening Spring, I took a research trip to San Francisco and bought a cocoa pod from Dandelion Chocolate, a bean-to-bar factory and café in the Mission District, and decided it should be our lucky charm. It worked, bringing us Sarah Johnson from Chez Panisse in California to be our head pastry chef.’


    CONFIT JAR FROM THE LANGUEDOC

    ‘When I was teaching in the area about 10 years ago, I picked up a lovely old confit jar from a brocante. It still sits on a shelf in my kitchen – it always startles me that something so practical can be so beautiful at the same time.’


    JELLY MOULDS FROM THE BAROSSA VALLEY

    ‘I found these copper moulds – one a lobster, the other a pineapple – in an antique and bric-a-brac shop near Maggie Beer’s farm in Australia. I’ve rarely used them, but I love the way they look and they remind me of a very happy weekend.’


    SPRING LEMONS FROM SICILY

    ‘Last year, after spending a glorious four days on the island, I was sent a box of the first lemons of the season, which are traditionally used for making limoncello. So we did the same – they were creamy and fragrant and made a delicious liqueur.’


    CANDIED CHESTNUTS FROM GENOA

    ‘These are my favourite sweet treats in the world – one of the things I look forward to most about autumn. The ones from Pietro Romanengo fu Stefano are the best I’ve ever tasted, not too sweet and with a very pure flavour.’


    LINEN NAPKINS FROM PARIS

    ‘Merci is one of the best shops in the city. It does a beautiful range of napkins and tablecloths, all in natural linen, in the prettiest colours. I add to my collection every time I visit.’


    BREAD BASKETS FROM COPENHAGEN

    ‘Bread is a passion of mine, and I picked up some woven bread baskets a few years ago. Technically, they’re for proving the dough. But I love the pale colour of the wood.’


    THE GJELINA COOKING BOOK FROM LA

    ‘Gjelina is a veg-centric restaurant in Venice Beach, LA, and its owners also run Gjusta, a wonderful bakery. I love the space – all light, white and woody – and what they are creating.’


    MURRAY RIVER SALT FROM VICTORIA

    ‘I can never come back from Australia without putting a bag of this delicate salt in my suitcase. It always reminds me of home.’

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